Tag Archives: Philip Johnson

Rybczynski reviews Dystopia

“Witold Rybczynski on architectural PTSD and what James Stevens Curl gets wrong (and right) in his controversial new book” is the sub-headline of Rybczynski’s review of Making Dystopia, the magisterial history of modern architecture by Britain’s most accomplished architectural historian. … Continue reading

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The mods’ survival explained

They cut the feedback loop. Nobody has done a better job of explaining the persistence of modern architecture than does Roger Scruton in his review of James Stevens Curl’s new book, Making Dystopia. In his review, Scruton sums up with … Continue reading

Posted in Architecture, Books and Culture | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

Bad trad and good trad

Two articles fished from today’s indispensable ArchNewsNow.com, the thrice-weekly free compendium of anglospherical articles on architecture, edited by Kristen Richards, show the use and misuse of classical traditions on opposite sides of the world. Guess which is which, above and … Continue reading

Posted in Architecture, Development, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Millais vs. Le Corbusier

Malcolm Millais, the author of Exploding the Myths of Modern Architecture, has written Le Corbusier, the Dishonest Architect, brought out in Britain by Cambridge Scholars Publishing, of Newcastle upon Tyne. It is a brave book and a necessary book, a … Continue reading

Posted in Architecture, Architecture History | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | 10 Comments

New Brown engineers’ crib

Modern architecture is easy to dislike. Its exemplars are ridiculous, its mythology is idiotic, and the methods by which it maintains dominance in the field of architecture are corrupt. I loathe modern architecture generally and feel little but contempt for … Continue reading

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Hark, a noble local Nobel!

Congratulations to Brown University for the Nobel won by one of its physics professors, Michael Kosterlitz. Moreover, congrats to Kosterlitz himself. His Nobel threw me for a loop. It was, I thought, for a discovery in topography, as if he’d … Continue reading

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Fascism, modernism paired

Mother’s milk flowing from her gentle soul, a good friend expressed at lunch yesterday her dismay at the fascist tendencies of modernist architect Philip Johnson. She is no fan of his buildings (there are two in Providence), but she was … Continue reading

Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture Education, Architecture History, Art and design, Books and Culture, Urbanism and planning | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Happy 14th birthday, ANN!

Today is ANN’s 14th birthday, the duoseptennial (neologism alert) anniversary of ArchitectureNewsNow.com – Kristen Richards’s glorious compendium of architectural news and opinion from around the world (at least the Anglosphere). I can think of no better way to commemorate this … Continue reading

Posted in Architects, Architecture, Architecture Education, Architecture History, Art and design, Interior Design, Photography, Preservation | Tagged , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Loopy inSANAA “River”

My life as a reporter of architectural design review proceedings has over-taxed my ocular muscularity. My eyeballs roll furiously whenever an architect declares that his building’s “remarkable transparency” allows it to give “new meaning to the concept of ‘blending in.’” … Continue reading

Posted in Architects, Architecture, Art and design, Development, Landscape Architecture, Urbanism and planning | Tagged , , , , , | 3 Comments

Propriety of prose and vase

Laura Heery sent me a few pages from Essays on the Nature and Principles of Taste, by Archibald Allison, published in 1832. Her communication arose from a discussion on Pro-Urb last month over the relationship of style to character in … Continue reading

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