Monthly Archives: March 2014

New date, time for Pennoyer talk

Fawlty information! Oops! Here’s the new, correct information on Peter Pennoyer’s talk in June at the Boston Athenaeum. Sorry for any confusion: Thursday, June 12 – Lecture by Peter Pennoyer, classical architect in New York City and national board member of … Continue reading

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Upcoming classical architecture dates

Here, briefly, are a number of upcoming events sponsored (or not) by the Institute of Classical Architecture & Art. Details and registration, where applicable, are here. Wednesday, March 26 – The inaugural Boston Design Week, beginning the 20th, features a panel … Continue reading

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L’Abattoir d’unité!

Malcolm Millais, author of Exploding the Myths of Modern Architecture (2009), has some interesting comments picking up on the skit by Monty Python posted Saturday: Although mainly about Freemasonry, in the skit the John Cleese architect designs an abattoir instead of an office block. … Continue reading

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Vote: “Happy” or “Stayin’ Alive”

The American Institute of Architects has announced its basic lack of seriousness as an organization by announcing that the artist who recorded “Happy” will be the keynote speaker for its upcoming convention. Now, I just watched/listened to “Happy” for the … Continue reading

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Monty Python’s skit on architects

As a reward for making it through the last few posts I offer this skit, from YouTube, of Monty Python making fun of architects by speaking truth of them, perhaps – since humor does after all require at least a … Continue reading

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Sad, glorious history of the Fogg

Here, before I unveil a bit of the sad Fogg history, is an intriguing comment from Eric Daum, whose lengthy and erudite essay on the Gloria Dei Swedish Evangelical Church, in Providence, graced this blog several weeks ago: I love … Continue reading

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Shoe slips on other foot

Michael Rouchell sends to TradArch a wonderful sketch of the new addition to the Villa Savoye, Le Corbusier’s pathbreaking modernist house of 1931 in suburban Paris. As intended, the addition raises interesting questions. Modernists are wary of additions to their work in … Continue reading

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Column: The secret to making great streets

The secret to great streets is that there is no secret, that great streets were once the norm, that making them is easy, and that we can have them again, even in America, if we want them. This is the … Continue reading

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Proposed for Benefit Street

Yesterday I posted about several projects in Providence, including an excavation of a front yard at 43 Benefit, the Joseph Jenckes House. I talked to Jason Martin of the city’s planning office and he sent me PDFs of the project, … Continue reading

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“Screams art museum”!

It sure does. That’s a direct quote from Thomas Lenz, head of Harvard Art Museums, intended as praise. The top comment after Harvard Magazine’s article about the Renzo Piano addition to the Fogg Museum of Art was “Is this really the … Continue reading

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