Capturing Charleston charm

King Street, in Charleston. Toward the beginning, many of these shots are north of Broad and west of King. Then there are some of the College of Charleston, some South of Broad, and some, again, on King, including a video of a pedicab ride at the bottom.

King Street, in Charleston.

Here are more than a few photos of Charleston. There are none of the city’s beautiful civic buildings on this post. Instead, I’ve tried to reveal the breadth of ornamental elegance in all of its 50 shades of great, from west of King to south of Broad. Toward the start are shots taken west of King, including a small neighborhood by Andrew Gould and George Holt. There are some dilapidated houses whose condition arises from a sensible policy of Mayor Riley’s against teardowns. Eventually they’ll be restored. There are a couple shots of the incredible campus of the College of Charleston, then we wander down south of Broad, where the livin’ is easy – even if it’s tough to find a grocery. Then some shots of commercial architecture, mostly on King. At the end is a video shot from a pedicab heading down King. Please enjoy.

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About David Brussat

For a living, I edit the writing of some of the nation's leading architects, urbanists and design theorists. This blog was begun in 2009 as a feature of the Providence Journal, where I was on the editorial board and wrote a weekly column of architecture criticism for three decades. Architecture Here and There fights the style wars for classical architecture and against modern architecture, no holds barred. My freelance writing and editing on that topic and others addresses issues of design and culture locally and globally. I am a fellow of the Royal Society of the Arts, and a member of the board of the New England chapter of the Institute of Classical Architecture & Art, which bestowed an Arthur Ross Award on me in 2002. I work from Providence, R.I., where I live with my wife Victoria, my son Billy and our cat Gato. If you would like to invest your prose with even more style and clarity, please email me at my consultancy, dbrussat@gmail.com, or call 401.351.0457. Testimonial: "Your work is so wonderful - you now enter my mind and write what I would have written." - Nikos Salingaros, mathematician at the University of Texas, architectural theorist and author of many books.
This entry was posted in Architecture, Architecture History, Art and design, Development, Landscape Architecture, Photography, Urbanism and planning, Video and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to Capturing Charleston charm

  1. arch329 says:

    Wonderful photos David. Thank you. Makes me lorn for one of my new favorite cities.

    Paddy Steinschneider

    Like

  2. Stephen ORourke says:

    Riley’s been mayor for quite awhile. I always liked the man even though…..well, you know.

    Sent from my iPad

    >

    Like

  3. Anonymous says:

    David, you continue to be a great architectural photographer. I fondly remember your photo collection at the ProJo. Your posting is timely, given that the working class folks apparently tend to congregate in nearby North Charleston. A lot of the buildings you show seem to be the classic gentrification of wealthy people who can afford to have bricked streets, beautiful gardens, restored mansions (and white police departments). Did you see any people of color living in these neighborhoods?

    Like

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