More trad buildings of 2020

The main Cathedral of the Russian Armed Forces. (Wikipedia)

Since posting “Best trad buildings of 2020” on the last day of that eminently lamentable year, more buildings for my annual roundup have come to my attention, including several pointed out by diligent readers of this blog. I am publishing them here and at the bottom of the original Dec. 31 post.

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The first, pictured above, is the Main Orthodox Cathedral of the Russian Armed Forces, dedicated on June 14, 2020. Designed in the Russian Orthodox Revival style, it commemorates what the Russians call the Great Patriotic War. Its steps are said to have been formed from melted down tanks of the Nazi Wehrmacht.

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The Waycroft is a three-building mixed-use comlex in Arlington, Va.

The Waycroft, which opened earlier this year, is a mixed-use residential complex, in Arlington, Va. Designed by David A. Swartz Architects, it has over 400 luxury units in three connected buildings, with a Target on the ground floor. A main building of Art Deco design rises in the background of the picture above, which focuses on a series of traditionally styled townhouses.

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Seminary of St. Joseph’s College, near Charlotte, N.C. (St. Joseph’s)

The seminary building of St. Joseph College, in Mount Holly, N.C., near Charlotte, was dedicated on Sept. 14 of this year. It was designed in the Gothic style by Michael G. Imber Architects.

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St. Mary of Sorrows Church. (St. Mary)

The new church in Fairfax, Va., for historic St. Mary of Sorrows, built around the congregation’s original tabernacle, was designed by McCrery Architects and dedicated last Nov. 15. The stained glass windows, created by Beyer Studio and to be set above its alter, represent the seven sorrows of Mary.

About David Brussat

This blog was begun in 2009 as a feature of the Providence Journal, where I was on the editorial board and wrote a weekly column of architecture criticism for three decades. Architecture Here and There fights the style wars for classical architecture and against modern architecture, no holds barred. History Press asked me to write and in August 2017 published my first book, "Lost Providence." I am now writing my second book. My freelance writing on architecture and other topics addresses issues of design and culture locally and globally. I am a member of the board of the New England chapter of the Institute of Classical Architecture & Art, which bestowed an Arthur Ross Award on me in 2002. I work from Providence, R.I., where I live with my wife Victoria, my son Billy and our cat Gato. If you would like to employ my writing and editing to improve your work, please email me at my consultancy, dbrussat@gmail.com, or call 401.351.0457. Testimonial: "Your work is so wonderful - you now enter my mind and write what I would have written." - Nikos Salingaros, mathematician at the University of Texas, architectural theorist and author of many books.
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2 Responses to More trad buildings of 2020

  1. Anonymous says:

    Great to see and the more firms design these, the more the public and clients will demand them. The Russian cathedral is extraordinary. Amazing that we still can build these buildings.

    Like

  2. Who says the old style can’t be built today. It is refreshing to see some mindfulness being used to design these buildings. Today, the results of architecture imposed on us are monkee see, monkee doo rectangles with rectangle windows, stainless steel frames, bare cement foundations, plastic or metal facades, etc. We are even lucky if the doorway faces Main Street rather than a parking lot. The trend today is ‘kill the village and bring on the dead zones’.

    Like

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